1920s

From before its opening in 1907, the Market Street Elevated spurred tremendous construction and population growth in West Philadelphia.

In the first half of the twentieth century, two campus plans—the Cret Report of 1913 and the Martin Report of 1948—called for the creation of a pedestrian campus free of urban congestion.

Woodside Park was an amusement park which thrilled Philadelphians with its attractions for almost 60 years.

The Arena began as an ice rink, but quickly expanded to an arena used for events like boxing matches, rodeos, and major political events.

Armstrong Association Fundraising Campaign Stamp

Concerned Philadelphians addressed the housing issues and discrimination faced by migrants.

A postcard advertising rowhouses for sale in 1914, just two years before Philadelphia experienced a severe housing crisis.

A housing crisis, combined with White resistance to Black settlement, created high rents and overcrowding for migrants in the first wave of the Great Migration.

A segregated waiting room crowded with travelers at the Jacksonville railroad depot.

Southern African American migrants shared a complex relationship with Philadelphia’s middle-class Black families with multigenerational ties to the city.

Southern Family Arriving in the North

The Great Migration left a lasting impact on West Philadelphia that can still felt and seen in residential patterns and community relationships today

Southern African Americans migrated to West Philadelphia for increased economic opportunity and the potential of homeownership.

Fay's Theater Sign

Fay’s Theatre, a small West Philadelphia entertainment venue, reflected the creation and transformation of community spaces during the Great Migration.

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