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Mill Creek Homes Low-Rise Greenspace

This photo shows the greenspace in the low-rise complex. Mill Creek Homes had 100-percent African American occupancy.

This photo shows a courtyard of the low-rises when they were new.

This aerial photo highlights the high-rise apartment buildings in the Mill Creek Homes development. 

Louis I. Kahn (left), with G. Holmes Perkins, dean of the University of Pennsylvania’s Graduate School of Fine Arts (second from left), and students. Kahn planned Mill Creek Homes. At Penn, 1957–61, Kahn designed Richards and Goddard Laboratories, today a National Historic Landmark.

Mill Creek Homes

Mill Creek Homes, a modernist public housing project designed by architect Louis I. Kahn, 1953–55; in its first phase consisting of three 17-storey elevator towers at 46th St. & Fairmount Ave. overlooking a cluster of two- and three-story houses on Aspen St.

High-Rise Public Housing in Mantua

In the decades after World War II, segregated public housing was planned to provide “safe and sanitary housing” for low-income residents—an aspirational goal that lacked both resources and political will to bring to fruition.

A subway-tube extension, constructed between 1952 and 1955, replaced the Woodland Avenue surface-trolley lines between 32nd and 39th streets. 

An undeveloped tract of land at 48th and Spruce streets became a baseball field that in the early 1930s was home to Black professional and semi-professional baseball teams. In the wartime 1940s, the field was home to hundreds of Victory Gardens. From the 1950s on, it was home to West Philadelphia High School’s football and baseball teams.

Employment of Girls from Households of Cotton and Woolen Mill Workers, West End Mill Area

Employment of Boys from Households of Cotton and Woolen Mill Workers, West End Mill Area

Employment of Girls from Households of Cotton and Woolen Mill Workers 1880

Employment of Boys from Households of Cotton and Woolen Mill Workers, 1880

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